music biz, music

♫ ♥ Jazz Songwriters ♥ ♫

Driving down the 405 to the annual IAJE convention in Long Beach in January 2002, I had to pull over when this song came on KJazz 88.1

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“I Can’t Be Choosy” –  Bruce Brown

OMG!!  Where did THAT come from?

I am a fool for wonderful songs in general, and thrilled by wonderful jazz songs, such as:

Screen Shot 2019-08-15 at 1.47.55 PMCloudburst!  – Jon Hendricks!

Screen Shot 2019-08-15 at 1.54.24 PM Zanzibar – Dave Frishberg!

Screen Shot 2019-08-15 at 2.09.11 PMDevil May Care – Bob Dorough!

Screen Shot 2019-08-15 at 3.02.27 PM“Your Mind Is On Vacation” –  Mose Allison!

Screen Shot 2019-08-15 at 3.09.41 PM“In The Name Of Love” –  Kenny Rankin!

Screen Shot 2019-08-15 at 3.34.23 PMGinny Carr’s UVJQ – “He Was The Cat”

Screen Shot 2019-08-15 at 4.43.42 PMLorraine Feather –   You’re Outa Here

Screen Shot 2019-08-15 at 4.51.57 PMDave Tull – “I Just Want To Get Paid”

SueMaskSue Maskaleris – “Unbreakable Heart”

Screen Shot 2019-08-15 at 6.10.01 PMMark Winkler – “Like Jazz”

All of these writers have tons more wonderful songs – go Google ’em!

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music biz, music

Mystique Vs. Music

Screen Shot 2019-08-04 at 6.01.32 PMThe cult of celebrity (AKA being famous for being famous) has muddied the waters of music for a long time.  Yet, after a lifetime of loving Beethoven’s music, (and Mozart’s, Schubert’s, Chopin’s, Brahms’,   etc.), I’m still moved by their works, without knowing much of the personal nature of their lives, if you can imagine that! For me, the logical development of the musical material gives meaning beyond the intrinsic beauty of their pieces – the music stands the test of time on its own merits, regardless of how celebrated or unpopular these creators were during the course of their lives.

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I was always a fan of Aaron Copland’s music, though I knew little of his private life and didn’t really care; it was enough to admire the fact he managed to earn a living from his compositions without needing a church gig, like J.S. Bach!  (It probably helped that, unlike Bach, Copland didn’t have 20 children to support!?)

 

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When I first met my teacher Hale Smith 49 years ago, I had never heard any of his works. As a teenager without funds to purchase recordings and in the absence of the internet, I didn’t become acquainted with his music until well after meeting him in person and becoming charmed by his vibrant character, energy and prodigious knowledge. While UConn had many fine faculty members who lived near the campus at Storrs, the music dept. also brought in professionals who made a living in NYC, and who provided an example of how it could be accomplished, for those of us who longed to make our mark in the music biz outside of academia. Hale was the chief shining beacon who inspired and encouraged me to imagine my own future as a professional musician.

But did I know his music? Do I know his music? Ummm…. maybe not-so-much!  Though brilliant, cogent and compelling, Hale’s “formal” music demands the listener truly pay attention to catch the nuances that constitute the integrity of his creations. For example, his Contours For Orchestra is pretty intense and difficult to appreciate on first hearing – at least for this listener!  Three Brevities (Allegro) is also complex, though composed for only a solo flute, and only one minute in duration!  Hale’s “casual” music is more accessible, I think, but still sophisticated and not completely grokked without paying attention.

We live in a society that frequently prizes big-name superstardom above actual accomplishment, and it’s easy to get swept up in the hype of celebrity; we’re certainly encouraged to do so by the media. One might argue that the personality pervades the creative end result and is indistinguishable  – but it seems to me that art falls or stands on its own 2 feet, regardless of the creator’s reputation. It takes effort to focus on more substantial values, in the arts and elsewhere. However, the rewards are worth the effort, IMHO.

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music, politics

I sang with Gabby Giffords tonight

There are heroes in our midst and sometimes they just appear from the dark on a Sunday evening in the park.

In addition to the fresh air, one of the greatest pleasures of attending an outdoor concert by the Tucson Pops is conductor László Veres. He is a man of steady habits; every Pops concert begins with The Star Spangled Banner and ends with the gorgeous Carmen Dragon arrangement of America The Beautiful. Every time I hear them, I get a little choked up. Between those two selections, there may be musical trips to other lands, but they’re always colored by the affection the Maestro has for the USA; he makes the audience proud and glad to be in America, just as he is.

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The Maestro is a naturalized American citizen who escaped from his native Hungary during the Holocaust, and he treasures his adopted country with a fierce passion that’s apparent in everything from his repertoire choices to his stories and patter between numbers. He’s written an excellent autobiography about it:  No Regrets.   László is a survivor, much like our former congresswoman, Gabrielle Giffords.

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We sang “Edelweiss” from THE SOUND OF MUSIC, accompanied by the Tucson Pops Orchestra in Reid Park tonight. After the intermission, Gabby had ridden up on her recumbent bike nearby to where we were seated and while the audience hummed the tune, her voice rang out clear and strong through the dark, unmistakably Gabby; “Blossom of snow, may you bloom and grow… bless our homeland forever”.  It brought me to tears, knowing how she has blessed Arizona with her leadership, and continues to bless the world with her example of fortitude and courage.

I just had to tell her how much we love her – how much it means to see her persisting in spite of challenges – how much strength it gives me to know that she’s still with us, carrying on with grace and perseverence. And how much I want her husband Captain Mark Kelly to become Senator Kelly (AZ). And how wonderful it would be to hear President Giffords sing “Edelweiss” someday.

It could happen, I assure you. Tonight, after we sang together, I shook her hand, and she’s one strong woman!

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music biz

I Love A Piano!

Screen Shot 2019-05-30 at 2.45.11 AMI’ve felt drawn to the piano from the very beginning – there’s just something about it that always made me want to touch it!

The first piano I recall was my Grandma Helen’s – a magical (to me!) baby grand.  When she’d play Chopin, I’d spin around dancing in the living room, collapsing in a dizzy toddler-heap – until she’d start playing again!  I began saving my allowance when I was 5 so that I could afford to buy my own piano; a turn-of-the-century painted-gray upright that had been in someone’s cellar for so long that it was impossible to bring the tuning up to concert pitch. With $20 for the piano, $20 to move it and $10 for the tuning, it wiped out my savings but was mine at age 10.

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Picture Me painted medium gray

My mother gave it away when I moved to NYC after college and I played the pianos down the street at Manhattan School of Music practice rooms until I could afford to buy another upright; a circa-1940s walnut-stained Söhmer for $285, moving and tuning included.

This stood me in good stead for about 5 years until I became accustomed to the sound of grand pianos in NYC’s recording studios – and then I felt the need to upgrade to a baby grand. While accompanying a friend who was shopping for a Yamaha studio upright, a beautiful August Förster caught my fancy… WAY out-of-my-league financially, but SUCH a gorgeous thing it was…

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I wound up borrowing from my mother to purchase a circa-1950s Harrington which set me back $1650, after $200 trade-in for my upright.  It recorded well and had a really nice sound for a small grand;  I loved it dearly until financial troubles in the late 1980s necessitated selling it, and I was piano-less for a few years. (Thank heavens for electronic keyboards, which got me over the hump!)

Harrington

We began piano shopping in 1994 and found a 1976 Steinway CB we fell in love with. (A “CB” designates that the piano was deemed by Steinway to be superior “concert-artist” quality).  I loved playing it for a few months, while knowing that it would need rebuilding to remove the Teflon bushings  (more on this issue  here) – and we could hear those tell-tale “clicks” begin to happen more frequently every day. So we handed it over to the absolutely finest technician who ever lived, Richard Davenport.  For 5 long months he labored, while I returned to my no-longer appreciated synthesizer, and only a photo of a Steinway B tacked to the wall where our Steinway had stood.

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David Anderson on Richard Davenport: life-changing!

Finally Richard returned it to us, sounding better than ever, and over the past 25 years it has proven to be a simply wonderful instrument in every way.  We’ve recorded over a dozen CDs on it. Technicians love tuning it and compliment its sound and action. It is truly worthy of love.

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I know that Billy Joel has expressed his affection for the piano in song, but I prefer the older song – performed here by two dear and extremely talented friends: Linda November & Artie Schroeck  – who ALSO “love a piano”!

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Home, self-acceptance

Baby with the Bathwater

JoySpark

I read both of Marie Kondo’s books when they were first published in English and I’ve noticed her publicist has been working overtime, increasing her visibility since her Netflix TV episodes began airing earlier this year.  While I adopted some of her ideas right away – (folding and storing so that all socks, shirts, etc. are visible just makes sense!) – I find her “throw everything in a pile” approach to be unnecessarily violent and even punitive; there are kinder, gentler ways to sort through and discard clutter without shaming ourselves. I find I need time to process tender feelings, especially dealing with unfinished business and items with sentimental value.

DeCluttering

What we choose to keep says a lot about who we are, and releasing our possessions can be a spiritual as well as physical and emotional journey. Even going through “junk drawers” in the kitchen takes more time than I would’ve thought – what to do with half-dead batteries?  My collection of twist-ties and tired old rubber bands reveals how hard I try to “keep it together” – and my willingness to sort through and discard such detritus tells me I’m ready to release a lot more stuff I don’t need.

junkdrawer

value of the purge

I agree with Gil Hedley (above), who champions the spiritual nature of sorting through, examining and recycling our “stuff” – knowing that while it doesn’t literally define us, it’s still a potent force to be reckoned with – in his words; “psychically and biologically active”.  Dietitians have been saying, “you are what you eat” for decades – perhaps now is a good time to entertain the idea that “you are what you keep!”

patterns

I’ve been noticing how certain items DO seem to carry an energetic charge – and that broken items are somewhat distressing to me; they cause a disconnect of sorts. As I become more aware of how my possessions actually make me FEEL, I’m hoping to release more than STUFF these days – I’d like to think I’m ready to let go of old habits and attitudes that don’t fit and/or don’t work for me any more – maybe they never did!?

Both of my parents were minimalists and left behind very little by way of clutter; they purged their belongings periodically and I wound up inheriting one office-sized storage box for each of them, the contents of which I scanned and shared with my sisters and other relatives. Knowing how my friends have grappled with their own parents’ possessions, I’m grateful my folks left such a small footprint.  My dad’s box contains his plays, reviews and indecipherable diaries, written in his own secret shorthand, along with a beret that stopped smelling like him many years ago, alas. My mom’s box has her drawings, writings, paper pop-up experiments, letters and cards.

The items of theirs that I’ve kept remind me of the REAL treasures they shared – the time they lavished on us, their artistic flair and aspirations, their love for us.  What else is worth cherishing?

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music biz

Leaving Los Angeles

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We just finished binge-re-watching EPISODES on Netflix and I enjoyed it even more than the first time. While we were never heavy hitters in the “big time” of television, movies or the music biz, enough of the glitter rubbed off from our years striving to get projects, and we met enough other people / wannabes, that every scenario was somehow familiar. Many of our friends had encountered these types of disappointments and we’d experienced enough sucker-punches ourselves to know that, by and large, THIS STUFF IS TRUE!  It actually happens!

One true story for us involved submitting music thru an industry list for a terrific-sounding film project called PRE-K. The script was smart and tight, with well-drawn characters; parents all vying to get their kid into a prestigious exclusive preschool. We were so excited at the prospect of becoming involved in this project that we not only composed and produced demos of the theme song, we wrote a school anthem in 4-part choral harmony! I felt in my bones that we had NAILED the essence of the film and would be a shoo-in as composers for the film!

Alas, a week after we’d sent in our submission, we drove by the offices of the production company and found it completely empty, with no hint that PRE-K had ever existed! We wondered whether this had been a “long con”  ala THE GRIFTERS (1990) , or a “sting” set up by the FBI to catch conmen who were defrauding film investors!? We never did find out!

There are heartwarming as well as heartbreaking stories about the mad grab for the brass ring of fame and fortune in show biz – and I DO miss some of the people I met and worked with in LaLa Land – the fact that many of them have also abandoned Hollywood has not escaped my notice. There were good reasons we went there, besides the generally agreeable weather…. AND there were good reasons why we left!

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learning

Avoiding Disconnect

CantEatThisHomework

As essential as technology has become for communication, certain sloppy habits have crept in and hinder our efforts to connect with one another. I wouldn’t have foreseen how disruptive bad grammar and poor spelling would be, but now even AP and other news sources appear to have fired their editors, leaving the reading public to figure out what’s meant in any given item that gets published, online OR in print.

One of the few exceptions is The New Yorker – for which I remain grateful. Far too many other publications don’t make a consistent effort to use language clearly – perhaps thinking that they’re being “hip”?  Please, no!  The older I get, the less I can handle bumps-in-the-road, literally AND figuratively!  It can be difficult enough already to understand and empathize with one another these days; let’s not obfuscate our message intentionally!

AutoCorrect

Susan Sontag weighs in on the truth of “the devil’s in the details”:

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